Invasive Plants & Restoration Ecology | SciShow Talk Show



Today Hank talks with Dr. Cara Nelson about invasive plants that use toxic chemicals and rapid reproduction to outcompete native plants, and Jessi brings some …
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40 comments

  1. So how about the spurge and blackberries and such growing back from the roots left behind after grazing??
    Unless the spurge is an annual weed, which may die by being chewed off at the base.. and blackberries are truly a perennial…
    Even so I think everyone should have a goat and a sheep 🙂
    Lets outlaw lawn mowers and chemical fertilizer!!!!😁😁😁

  2. Ok thats cool . i never knew the ringneck and Eurasian were different bc they seem similar. Also their calls!! Usually i hear the ringneck call and few times Eurasian but I NEVER KNEW IT WAS EURASIA!! I always thought it was a confused dove singing lol

  3. I had a white dove named Angel that was a school pet in 4th grade. The teacher gave her to me when she moved away at the end of the following school year. She looked a lot like the white one showed here, but not that thin. Her beak was a slightly darker pink too. She laid her first eggs starting when I took her home for spring break, and laid about 2 more every 6 weeks or so for about 8 more years. She then lived another decade after the avian equivalent of menopause. For the last few years she was too weak to fly much. We once left her cage wide open for a whole year without noticing it as she never tried to leave.

  4. I had a white dove named Angel that was a school pet in 4th grade. The teacher gave her to me when she moved away at the end of the following school year. She looked a lot like the white one showed here, but not that thin. Her beak was a slightly darker pink too. She laid her first eggs starting when I took her home for spring break, and laid about 2 more every 6 weeks or so for about 8 more years. She then lived another decade after the avian equivalent of menopause. For the last few years she was too weak to fly much. We once left her cage wide open for a whole year without noticing it as she never tried to leave.

  5. Pigeons may be an invasive species, but they provide a heck of a lot of meat for hawks, owls, foxes, and other native species. I suspect that these domesticated pigeons have helped fill the prey gap left by the extinction of the passenger pigeons.

  6. …So leafy spurge contains latex? Can it be eradicated by gathering it for that latex? There's nothing that eradicates species like human greed, so if the noxious weed can be used as a source, then over-graze it for human purposes, and it would soon disappear.

  7. There's a pair of these doves in the tree in front of my windows. Years ago, there was a white one too. (that's in Vienna)
    [note: how exactly does she write "eksetera"? *gnnnn*]

  8. I understand that host has to add comments or ask additional questions to the guest in order to manipulate the topic a bit. But I couldn't stop feeling that Hank was in inebriated mind. The comments or questions he brought up were a bit arrogant and unattractive. Felt sorry for Dr. Nelson for his behavior.
    Though the topic was interesting, thank you for inviting such a specialist.

  9. Two topics I’ve dealt with as a wetland naturalist!

    One of the big issues the groups I’ve worked with in invasive weed eradication is the issue of removing invasive plants just to have them return. In species that produce clumps or have deep taproots or long runners/stolons, we had real issues with soil disturbance upon removal making for a prime seed bed for more prolific seed dispersers. What worked in some cases (when feasible based on species and accessibility) was to cut down the offending clump and paint glyphosate – with no surfactants – onto the wounded plant. This killed the invasive without disturbing the soil or making the surrounding area a kill zone for plugs we planted around the dying weed. Really labor intensive and particular to perennial species, though. It’s not like this method can be used on Medusahead Grass (though controlled burns help against that one). In California salt marshes, we are dealing with a weird invasive dilemma: a super vigorous hybrid between a non-native cordgrass and our native one has started dramatically altering wetland shape and structure to the reduction of how many species the wetlands can support. However, there are a couple endangered/threatened species of rails that live in the cordgrass and are doing well in the areas the new hybrid is taking over, since it grows denser than predators like herons are used to penetrating into.

    There are a bunch of double-brood bird species, though the actual studies on them are generally centered around species that routinely nest near humans or in human-managed nest boxes (which can be effectively monitored). There appears to be a correlation to successful multi-brood behavior in Eastern Bluebirds and latitude, with birds on the east coast of North America in the north having larger clutch sizes and fewer broods compared to smaller clutch size and more broods in the south. On the west coast, California Quail will rear multiple broods with previous broods remaining in a flock with the new chicks. Marsh Wrens will try to attract a female by building many framework nests that one will be selected from and finished by the female; sometimes another female can select another nest in the same male’s territory and two broods will be raised at once, plus wrens have been implicated in returning after successfully fledging young and raising another brood.

  10. My cat brought in a wood pigeon once. He was so proud! You could hear him purring from the next room.

    And he was most upset when I released the mostly unharmed pigeon into the wild again.

  11. Not to argue with the professor here, but I was literally just at a conference where Prof. Doug Tallamy gave a presentation on research that demonstrates that any nonnative plant is essentially ecologically useless to native fauna. I don’t agree with the notion that some nonnative plants are innocuous, rather I think it would be better to say that some nonnative plants are less harmful than others.

  12. Love your channel. I especially enjoyed this episode as, I myself, am a restoration ecologist. I love "shouting from the mountaintop" so I gave you a little shout out on my Instagram – @eco_joe22. Thanks again.

  13. The interviewer shouldn't manterrupt her all the time trying to talk almost as much as her, the expert. I felt like she constantly had to fight to speak more than 1-2 phrases.

  14. I've been battling allelopathic Spotted Knapweed on my land for several years and finally have it under control. But I drive out and see it taking over my neighbor's land and for miles that's all you see gowing along the highway. Hopeless!

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